LLTK News

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Now Available Online: Our 2016 Annual Report

2016-Printed-Annual-Report2016 marked our 30th year of work to restore wild salmon and steelhead and provide sustainable fishing in the Pacific Northwest.

It was a year of growth, new project work, and celebratory anniversary events. We hosted our first ever VIP fishing derby, forged new partnerships, launched impressive new initiatives, and more.

Read about some of what we accomplished in 2016, and the entities that partnered with us, in our 2016 Digital Annual Report.

 

A Special Message from LLTK Board Member Jim Kraft

Dear Friends,

For more than 50 years, my family and I have fished the Salish Sea, trolling for Blackmouth in the winter and chasing Coho and Chinook salmon in the summer. Spots like the west side of Orcas Island, Obstruction Pass, Elliot Bay, and Point No Point bring back so many great memories!

Fishing is an important part of my heritage and contributes to my sense of place. It is central to how I define my home in this region. Yet, fishing has changed dramatically over recent decades, making it harder and harder to continue as before.  Read more

Is the Hood Canal Bridge Impacting Out-Migrating Salmon and Steelhead?

LLTK is working with our partners to better understand and mitigate the impacts of the Hood Canal Bridge on out-migrating salmon and steelhead. This work is based on recent research findings by scientists from NOAA Fisheries, which indicated that 36% of juvenile steelhead being tracked as they migrated past the Bridge were presumed dead; and on preliminary modeling conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory which showed that the Bridge may be restricting water circulation in Hood Canal. Read more

Lummi Fishermen Complete Fourth Year of Tangle Net Fishery

On June 15th, Lummi fishermen completed another year of their pilot tangle net fishery.  This project, begun in 2012, stemmed from discussions between Lummi Natural Resources staff, Long Live the Kings and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).  The purpose of the selective fishery is threefold: to gather information on the status of the early Chinook spawning migration; to test the feasibility of conducting a traditional fishery in a manner that would protect ESA listed species; and to provide access to surplus hatchery fish returning to the North Fork Chinook supplementation program at WDFW’s Kendall Creek Hatchery. Read more

“In Our Hands” – Our Anniversary Video

LLTK began 30 years ago as a single project in a remote coastal watershed. As we celebrate our 30th anniversary, our work–and our impact–has expanded throughout the Pacific Northwest and now stretches into Canada. Throughout, our guiding principle has remained the same: the future of salmon is in our hands.