LLTK News

JOIN US: To receive LLTK news, event updates, and links to salmon recovery articles in local media, please join our community on Facebook and Twitter.


 

Save the Date! Our 2017 Benefit Dinner is April 20 in Seattle

Please join us for Salish Stories: Fish Tales and Sea Shanties, our 2017 Benefit Dinner, on Thursday, April 20, at Sodo Park, in Seattle. Here is a preview of this year’s event:

  • LLTK Founder and Board Chairman Jim Youngren will be honored with our Lifetime Achievement Award in Salmon Conservation
  • Incredible live and silent auction items including Husky football tickets!
  • Salmon stories from the LLTK community
  • A peek at our brand new Survive the Sound campaign
  • More details to come!

 

Expect your invitation in the mail soon! To make sure you don’t miss an update, follow us on Facebook and Twitter. If you don’t already receive LLTK’s eNewsletter, scroll down to the form in the footer and sign up!

To purchase tickets, click here >


SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

  • Sponsorship opportunities are available! To learn more, contact Daniel Poppe at 206.382.9555, x21, or email dpoppe@lltk.org. You may also download a Sponsorship Benefits Sheet.
  • View photos from last year’s Benefit Dinner here.

‘Seafood Sleuths’ Study Salmon Declines (Seattle Times)

“‘Seafood sleuths’ study mystery of Pacific Northwest salmon declines”

By Duke’s Chowder House

Wherever you live in the Pacific Northwest, you likely have salmon for neighbors. And while the human population boom shows no sign of slowing (about 3.5 million in the Seattle metro area covering the vast swath from Everett to Tacoma), it’s an entirely different story for the salmon.

For reasons no one fully understands yet, juvenile chinook salmon, coho salmon and steelhead (the Washington state fish) are surviving at far less than historic levels in Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia, the combined international waters known as the Salish Sea.

One of the organizations taking a leading stewardship role in salmon conservation is Long Live the Kings, which has worked since 1986 to restore wild salmon and steelhead populations and support sustainable recreational, commercial and tribal fishing in the waters of the Pacific Northwest.

Read more at the Seattle Times.

Now Available Online: Our 2016 Annual Report

2016-Printed-Annual-Report2016 marked our 30th year of work to restore wild salmon and steelhead and provide sustainable fishing in the Pacific Northwest.

It was a year of growth, new project work, and celebratory anniversary events. We hosted our first ever VIP fishing derby, forged new partnerships, launched impressive new initiatives, and more.

Read about some of what we accomplished in 2016, and the entities that partnered with us, in our 2016 Digital Annual Report.

 

A Special Message from LLTK Board Member Jim Kraft

Dear Friends,

For more than 50 years, my family and I have fished the Salish Sea, trolling for Blackmouth in the winter and chasing Coho and Chinook salmon in the summer. Spots like the west side of Orcas Island, Obstruction Pass, Elliot Bay, and Point No Point bring back so many great memories!

Fishing is an important part of my heritage and contributes to my sense of place. It is central to how I define my home in this region. Yet, fishing has changed dramatically over recent decades, making it harder and harder to continue as before.  Read more

Is the Hood Canal Bridge Impacting Out-Migrating Salmon and Steelhead?

LLTK is working with our partners to better understand and mitigate the impacts of the Hood Canal Bridge on out-migrating salmon and steelhead. This work is based on recent research findings by scientists from NOAA Fisheries, which indicated that 36% of juvenile steelhead being tracked as they migrated past the Bridge were presumed dead; and on preliminary modeling conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory which showed that the Bridge may be restricting water circulation in Hood Canal. Read more

Lummi Fishermen Complete Fourth Year of Tangle Net Fishery

On June 15th, Lummi fishermen completed another year of their pilot tangle net fishery.  This project, begun in 2012, stemmed from discussions between Lummi Natural Resources staff, Long Live the Kings and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).  The purpose of the selective fishery is threefold: to gather information on the status of the early Chinook spawning migration; to test the feasibility of conducting a traditional fishery in a manner that would protect ESA listed species; and to provide access to surplus hatchery fish returning to the North Fork Chinook supplementation program at WDFW’s Kendall Creek Hatchery. Read more

“In Our Hands” – Our Anniversary Video

LLTK began 30 years ago as a single project in a remote coastal watershed. As we celebrate our 30th anniversary, our work–and our impact–has expanded throughout the Pacific Northwest and now stretches into Canada. Throughout, our guiding principle has remained the same: the future of salmon is in our hands.