News: Partners

Long Live the Kings Partners with Ray’s Boathouse and Café

Long Live the Kings is proud to have forged a partnership with Ray’s Boathouse and Café. Now stronger together, we will work to move our mission forward to recover wild salmon and steelhead, and support sustainable fishing.

To help achieve that mission, and serve the community with the finest local seafood, Ray’s will do what they always have, source and harvest salmon sustainably. But with this partnership their commitment deepens beyond the fish they serve, they are joining in hands-on recovery work in the field. They are learning about the issues facing salmon to become educated ambassadors, able to impart the ways we can all be better stewards of these icons. And they are providing essential funding that allow us to continue our research and recovery efforts in Puget Sound, and beyond.

With a rapidly growing human population and economy, we believe it is critical that the business community, especially those tied so closely to the fate of our salmon and steelhead, actively protect the resource to help ensure that this continues to be a special place where salmon thrive.

We extend a deep thanks Ray’s Boathouse and Café for their desire to do good, and dig into the collaborative work necessary to restore our salmon and steelhead.

Alison Morrow, King 5 News

Seals, Sea Lions Studied to Track Fish Health (King 5 News)

Scientists at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and King 5’s Alison Morrow were out looking for sea lion scat in order to better understand their diets, and whether they are consuming salmon. Work to determine whether harbor seals are consuming juvenile steelhead, a component of the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project, was also covered in this report. This coverage highlights work related to the Salish Sea Marine Survival Project. Harbor seals and sea lions are salmon and steelhead predators in the Salish Sea. Seals and sea lions have thrived in the Salish Sea as a result of the Marine Mammal Protection Act: they have few natural predators remaining. Staple food sources for these seals and sea lions, such as forage fish, pacific cod and hake, have also declined. With rising populations and declining food sources, researches are working to identify what sort of impact they are having on salmon and steelhead populations.

A big thank you to our partners at Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, NOAA Fisheries, and the Nisqually Tribe for executing this research in South Puget Sound.

Watch the full story at King 5.

Now Available Online: Our 2016 Annual Report

2016-Printed-Annual-Report2016 marked our 30th year of work to restore wild salmon and steelhead and provide sustainable fishing in the Pacific Northwest.

It was a year of growth, new project work, and celebratory anniversary events. We hosted our first ever VIP fishing derby, forged new partnerships, launched impressive new initiatives, and more.

Read about some of what we accomplished in 2016, and the entities that partnered with us, in our 2016 Digital Annual Report.

 

Is the Hood Canal Bridge Impacting Out-Migrating Salmon and Steelhead?

LLTK is working with our partners to better understand and mitigate the impacts of the Hood Canal Bridge on out-migrating salmon and steelhead. This work is based on recent research findings by scientists from NOAA Fisheries, which indicated that 36% of juvenile steelhead being tracked as they migrated past the Bridge were presumed dead; and on preliminary modeling conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory which showed that the Bridge may be restricting water circulation in Hood Canal. Read more

Lummi Fishermen Complete Fourth Year of Tangle Net Fishery

On June 15th, Lummi fishermen completed another year of their pilot tangle net fishery.  This project, begun in 2012, stemmed from discussions between Lummi Natural Resources staff, Long Live the Kings and the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW).  The purpose of the selective fishery is threefold: to gather information on the status of the early Chinook spawning migration; to test the feasibility of conducting a traditional fishery in a manner that would protect ESA listed species; and to provide access to surplus hatchery fish returning to the North Fork Chinook supplementation program at WDFW’s Kendall Creek Hatchery. Read more

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